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Meet your chef for Sukkot

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We, at Taube Jewish Heritage Tours, celebrate the value of limmud, the concept of teaching and –more importantly– learning from one another.
We’re already preparing for the October celebrations of Sukkot and that’s why we would like to share a few facts about this special holiday.

 

Sukkot is a break from challenges and divisions; it’s a joyous holiday and a moment to immerse ourselves in the Jewish experience. At the same time, it is meant to remind us of the many journeys we have taken throughout history.

 

 

There are three festivals that celebrate the journeys of the Jewish people, but Sukkot is much more than a pilgrimage holiday. What makes it special is reflected in the different names we have for it.

 

The first name, Chag HaSukkot, is a simple reminder about the sukkahs — the shelters built in the desert . Because the holiday happens in the ancient time of the fall harvest, it is also known as Chag Haasif, “The Festival of Gathering”. In addition, some may also call it Zeman Simchatenu, “The Time of Our Rejoicing”, which emphasises the importance of community in the Jewish experience.

 

As is the case with most Jewish holidays, Sukkot has a mystical side to it. According to the Zohar’s traditions, our sukkahs are visited by the ushpizin, seven special guests. Each guest represents a unique value that serves as a foundation for our identity.

 

Of course, there can be no Sukkot without food. There’s no special dish associated with the celebration but –since it’s a harvest festival– fresh and stuffed vegetables are often served. That is why we decided to celebrate Sukkot with Jeffrey Yoskowitz, a true food lover and passionate explorer of the Ashkenazi Cuisine. 

 

Of course, there can be no Sukkot without food. There’s no special dish associated with the celebration but — since it’s a harvest festival — fresh and stuffed vegetables are often served. That is why we decided to celebrate Sukkot with Jeffrey Yoskowitz, a true food lover and passionate explorer of the Ashkenazi Cuisine.

 

Jeffrey is a celebrity chef and co-authorof the Gefilte Manifesto New Recipes for Old World Jewish Foods – the “narrative cookbook” which includes traditional recipes with his own take on them.

In case you haven’t your hardcopy of the book, you can get yours here.


He’s also our scholar-in-residence and a consultant on the HISTORY, HERITAGE AND HERRING tour that happens to coincide with Sukkot celebrations

 

The tour is a unique culinary experience. We will explore the food cultures of Lithuania and Poland and learn how Jewish culture influenced the cuisine of the region. We will learn where the famous bagels are from and how to make our own cheese. 
This tour is also a great opportunity to meet local communities, artisans and craftsmen.


The involvement of Jeffrey Yoskowitz means that we will get to learn how to cook delicious, traditional food with a modern spin. As an expert in pickles, bialys, gefilte fish and other delicacies, he will share his favorite Sukkot recipes with us.

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